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Posts Tagged ‘privileged access’

Zero days and cyber-warfare

Thursday, December 18th, 2014

The ongoing saga of the Sony hack is quite interesting. Some notable developments:

  • It is quite clear that the attack on Sony was at least ordered and funded by a state actor (North Korea). They may have hired out the actual work to a criminal gang (in case they did not have adequate domestic talent to carry this off) but they certainly are behind it.
  • Sony has decided to pull the release of their movie about assasination of North Korea’s dictator. In effect, the aggressor in this case has won, the victim has capitulated. This is really unprecedented.
  • If you define cyber-warfare as aggressive action by a nation state, causing economic or physical harm, through disruption of digital systems, then this is clearly cyber-war. The only comparable case I can think of is the Stuxnet worm used by Americans and Israelis to disrupt Iranian centrifuges.

So how did the attack succeed so spectacularly? Presumably there was some combination of zero-day vulnerabilities and perhaps spear-phishing attacks against Sony’s network and people. This would get the attacker into the Sony network, but not compromise the entire house of cards.

From there, one assumes some combination of packet sniffing, DNS spoofing and/or keylogging was used to allow the attackers to expand their scope of influence. This is where a privileged access management system would have come in handy – to slow down the advance of the hackers. At the same time, there appears to have been a total failure to detect the ongoing attack. A SIEM system would presumably have helped to detect that something was amiss, as would a Data Loss Prevention (DLP) system.

Why all of these systems either were not in place to protect Sony, or did not function, is anybody’s guess. If nothing else, this incident should be a wake-up call to other organizations, reminding them that:

  • You are a target, whether you like it or not.
  • Zero day exploits and spearphishing attacks can be used to get inside your perimeter. Only an air gap will keep your perimeter 100% secure, and that’s not compatible with an ongonig business.
  • Security infrastructure, including patch management, perimeter defense, privileged access management, SIEM and DLP is not an option. You need all these components, and vigilance, to mitigate the risk inherent in attackers getting into your network.

Stay safe everyone!

Another day, another rogue admin

Wednesday, May 21st, 2014

Some people never learn, I guess.

This guy: (link to IT World article) will spend some quality time in jail for sabotaging work systems before he learned about his own imminent termination.

Getting fired sucks. Going to jail for these shenanigans is definitely worse.

Clearly, a privileged access management system could have mitigated the harm.

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