Did your company spend millions on “access governance” and fail to automate anything?

Imagine that you’re a mid-sized organization (say 2,500 employees in the case of a particular, real-world organization I have in mind) and a few years ago your company took the advice of a leading systems integrator / consulting firm and purchased licenses for the market leading IAM product.

You have since invested over $4 million in software, runtime platform, maintenance fees and lots (!) of implementation services. You have purchased as much consulting time as seemed appropriate, and you still have projects on the go.

By this time, after this much time and money spent, you would expect to have a lot of integrations and process automation in place, wouldn’t you? Several years and 4 million dollars should buy a lot, you’d think.

Unfortunately, if you were convinced to buy SailPoint, you probably haven’t got much to show for it. You have an excellent platform for running access certification campaigns, and you have built a system that integrates directly with your AD domain, plus consumes all sorts of CSV files from many applications, but that’s about it.

You haven’t automated any joiner/mover/leaver processes.

You don’t have a request portal rolled out to your users.

The SoD enforcement is sketchy at best — there are definitely ways to submit requests that should but do not trigger SoD violations.

Integrations are mainly via “flat files” — not real connectors.

But hey – there are pretty dashboards! Those must add value, right?

That’s not a great way to spend $4 million, but the integrator keeps proposing more — though every deployment phase seems to amount to just more CSV file “integrations.”

Maybe it’s time to get off the treadmill and look at better solutions, that can actually automate IAM processes, rather than delivering “access governance” but only promising (and never delivering) IAM process automation?

I can name a few organizations in this boat. Are you stuck in this situation too?

Please ‘like’ or ‘share’ if this scenario sounds all too familiar.

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